FAQ 2017-10-30T10:19:19+00:00

FAQ

FAQ

Three (3) things:
1.Close the windows
2. Make sure the water (outside) is turned on
3. Take the cars out of the driveway.
That’s it!

Only if you want to be. As long as the windows are closed the water on & the cars out of the driveway you can leave a check in the mailbox or with a neighbor.

Yes, & it will also remove the dirt.

The correct question is will it “look clean?” Aluminum siding that is over 15 years old will oxidize, especially in shaded areas, under trees and under overhangs. The example we use is to compare it to a car.  They’re both made of metal, both have a finish and they both rust.  If you take a 15-20 year old car through a carwash the car will be clean, but it will still have the rust spots, dents, chipped up paint etc. but it will “look” better after the wash than before.

Absolutely, Paint it!  Because it is generally a smooth surface painting it is quick, (only requiring one coat to cover in most cases) and rarely does the paint fail. The other alternative is to vinyl side it, which is about 20 times more expensive.

No, Vinyl siding is not metal and will not rust or oxidize.

Yes & no.  The outside of the windows will be cleaned with the same solution as the siding & naturally will be cleaner. Often only the inside of the windows will have to be cleaned after a house-wash. We concentrate on the siding.

Yes it will, if we used high pressure to clean, which we don’t. High pressure forces water under the siding & wets the under side which never drys & will eventually rot over time. Many “professional power washers,” especially those who do this part time or are new to this business do use high pressure (not a good idea). We stress the importance of using only low pressure (no more than your garden hose) to apply & rinse the detergents that actually do the cleaning.

Depending on how big & how dirty the house is, between 1 and 1 1/2 hours. Don’t go by how long it takes, Some “house washers” take all day, they use high pressure, up close, get water under the siding & charge way more than necessary, but that’s the way it is. We hand brush the outside of the gutters, if needed, at no extra charge.

NO!! (not vinyl, not aluminum, not asbestos & not nailite) Wood shakes or tung & groove cedar ….you’d better.

Once a week! Just kidding. Once again, using a car as a comparison, some people wash their car once a week, others monthly, others wash it when it looks dirty & others never wash it! About 60% of our customers wash once a year, 30% wash every two years & the remaining 10% are divided between those who get a little crazy & have us back two or three times a season (for an upcoming party etc). Others who will call only when the house is a mess. Everyone’s a little different, but once you do have your home professionally cleaned, you’ll want it to look that nice all the time.
It does depend on what kind of wood was used to build it. Yellow Pine (pressure treated) wood can be treated immediately. It should be lightly cleaned & either sealed or stained. Cedar decks require some time between the cutting & the application of sealers or stains. Cedar takes about 4 months to leach most of the tannins (the wood’s natural anti-bug chemical) so it is recommended you wait the 4 months before applying anything. If you’re certain the wood was cut more than 4 months ago, as verified by the lumber supplier or the deck builder, then it should be lightly cleaned, a mill glaze remover applied & then either sealed or stained. Redwood is handled the same way.
Call for a free estimate & we’ll give you all your options. You’ll be surprised how nice an older deck can look with just a good cleaning & a coat of quality stain. The condition of the wood & what coatings were applied before determine whether a sealant, transparent stain or solid stain would be the best application.
Brother-in-laws usually apply way too much of whatever they are applying. The old adage “If some is good, then more has got to be better,” is one way of really making a mess of your nice, expensive deck. We find decks with double & triple coatings or the application of CWF, applied & reapplied with multiple coats, year after year. These decks look terrible & the best thing to do is to start over. Completely strip the deck (or fence) with a stripper, clean & apply a quality stain.
They both have a place in caring for a deck. Wood sealers come in a variety of qualities ranging from some costing as little as $5 a gallon or as much as $20. Most sealers will last just one season & should be reapplied within the year. The best of them offer some protection up to 18 months, depending on the wood & the weather. The advantage with sealers is that they’re cheap, can be applied rather quickly & the deck will look like it was installed yesterday. It is usually a clear coating & for someone who enjoys, “the natural look of the wood,” it can be the perfect solution.
Stain is more costly, gallon prices start at about $18 & go as high as $70! There are basically 2 types, transparent & solid.
Transparent stains come in a limited number of colors. Like the furniture in your home, the wood takes on the color of the stain. The grain remains visible & the oils in the stain penetrate the wood to give it color. Note- this is why preparation is so important. If the wood has old stain or sealer the new stain will not be able to penetrate into the wood, will lay on top of the old stain or sealer & ultimately fail. This type of stain will last from 18 to 36 months depending on the color. Huh? Yes, the color. The darker the stain the longer it will last. Darker stains contain more pigment & the more pigment the longer the wood will retain the color. Make sense? One coat is recommended for transparent stain.

Solid stain… advantages- many colors to choose from, hides defects in the wood & it can make an old deck look really great. If done correctly it can last 5-7 years. The main disadvantage of solid stain is that is very expensive to apply correctly. It requires cleaning, applying a primer coat & two applications of solid stain. That’s like painting your deck 3 times, therefore 3 times the cost! Some people use solid stain without a primer & just apply it every year. It’s not the right way to do it & it will fail if not for the fact that it’s done every year, but it is an option. (See “Stains/Color” for update on Flood One Coat system)

The next day (24 hours). It can also be used on a limited basis between cleaning & coating. (No spilling BBQ grease or oil)
Sealers last one season on average. Transparent stains last 1 1/2 to 3 years depending on the color & weather.
Simple… read everything about decks. It’s the exact same process. Clean, then seal or stain.
Minor exterior repairs, exterior painting, gutter cleaning (only with a house wash), some odd jobs & financial planning. Just kidding about the financial planning but some power washers apparently do just about everything from driveway sealing, window washing, chimney sweeping & repairs & I’m sure their work is good ( I hate to knock the competition), but all we do is what we do.

Yes and it’s officially ok to wear some shades of white after labor day.
1. Don’t water your house or deck. Keep the water on the lawn & bushes, not the house or deck. The extra moisture & added drying times can significantly increase the rate of mildew growth. It’s unsightly & slippery if it grows on a walk or deck.
2. Keep a sturdy pan under the BBQ 7 empty it often, especially if you keep it on your deck. Grease penetrates into the wood & it’s a nightmare to remove. (A normal cleaning will not remove it).
3. Buy vinyl shutters. Cheap, come in lots of colors & very easy to maintain.
4. If your aluminum siding is shot, paint it!
5. Keep your gutters & leaders clean.
6. If you have brick on the ground (patio, walkway) make sure you have enough sand in the cracks. This is a very bad thing not to do. The deterioration process is as follows: The sand that was originally in the cracks blows away &/or rain water compresses the sand that was there. Then when there is an empty crack (between the bricks) dirt blows in. Weeds & grass begin to grow in the cracks. Then you remove the weeds (& the dirt). Then water seeps between the bricks & at first only one brick is a little crooked, then a second & so on & so on, until you have to call in a bricklayer to pull the whole thing out & start over. So just throw some play sand in the cracks & you won’t have big problems later on.
7. Get three estimates for any project around the house & call the Department of Consumer Affairs if you suspect a potential problem. Make certain the company you’re dealing with is licensed & insured. If someone working on your property damages your property & is not licensed & uninsured it’s coming out of YOUR homeowners policy, not the company you hired.
8. Say thank you. You’re Welcome

Three (3) things:
1.Close the windows
2. Make sure the water (outside) is turned on
3. Take the cars out of the driveway.
That’s it!

Only if you want to be. As long as the windows are closed the water on & the cars out of the driveway you can leave a check in the mailbox or with a neighbor.

Yes, & it will also remove the dirt.

The correct question is will it “look clean?” Aluminum siding that is over 15 years old will oxidize, especially in shaded areas, under trees and under overhangs. The example we use is to compare it to a car.  They’re both made of metal, both have a finish and they both rust.  If you take a 15-20 year old car through a carwash the car will be clean, but it will still have the rust spots, dents, chipped up paint etc. but it will “look” better after the wash than before.

Absolutely, Paint it!  Because it is generally a smooth surface painting it is quick, (only requiring one coat to cover in most cases) and rarely does the paint fail. The other alternative is to vinyl side it, which is about 20 times more expensive.

No, Vinyl siding is not metal and will not rust or oxidize.

Yes & no.  The outside of the windows will be cleaned with the same solution as the siding & naturally will be cleaner. Often only the inside of the windows will have to be cleaned after a house-wash. We concentrate on the siding.

Yes it will, if we used high pressure to clean, which we don’t. High pressure forces water under the siding & wets the under side which never drys & will eventually rot over time. Many “professional power washers,” especially those who do this part time or are new to this business do use high pressure (not a good idea). We stress the importance of using only low pressure (no more than your garden hose) to apply & rinse the detergents that actually do the cleaning.

Depending on how big & how dirty the house is, between 1 and 1 1/2 hours. Don’t go by how long it takes, Some “house washers” take all day, they use high pressure, up close, get water under the siding & charge way more than necessary, but that’s the way it is. We hand brush the outside of the gutters, if needed, at no extra charge.

NO!! (not vinyl, not aluminum, not asbestos & not nailite) Wood shakes or tung & groove cedar ….you’d better.

Once a week! Just kidding. Once again, using a car as a comparison, some people wash their car once a week, others monthly, others wash it when it looks dirty & others never wash it! About 60% of our customers wash once a year, 30% wash every two years & the remaining 10% are divided between those who get a little crazy & have us back two or three times a season (for an upcoming party etc). Others who will call only when the house is a mess. Everyone’s a little different, but once you do have your home professionally cleaned, you’ll want it to look that nice all the time.
It does depend on what kind of wood was used to build it. Yellow Pine (pressure treated) wood can be treated immediately. It should be lightly cleaned & either sealed or stained. Cedar decks require some time between the cutting & the application of sealers or stains. Cedar takes about 4 months to leach most of the tannins (the wood’s natural anti-bug chemical) so it is recommended you wait the 4 months before applying anything. If you’re certain the wood was cut more than 4 months ago, as verified by the lumber supplier or the deck builder, then it should be lightly cleaned, a mill glaze remover applied & then either sealed or stained. Redwood is handled the same way.
Call for a free estimate & we’ll give you all your options. You’ll be surprised how nice an older deck can look with just a good cleaning & a coat of quality stain. The condition of the wood & what coatings were applied before determine whether a sealant, transparent stain or solid stain would be the best application.
Brother-in-laws usually apply way too much of whatever they are applying. The old adage “If some is good, then more has got to be better,” is one way of really making a mess of your nice, expensive deck. We find decks with double & triple coatings or the application of CWF, applied & reapplied with multiple coats, year after year. These decks look terrible & the best thing to do is to start over. Completely strip the deck (or fence) with a stripper, clean & apply a quality stain.
They both have a place in caring for a deck. Wood sealers come in a variety of qualities ranging from some costing as little as $5 a gallon or as much as $20. Most sealers will last just one season & should be reapplied within the year. The best of them offer some protection up to 18 months, depending on the wood & the weather. The advantage with sealers is that they’re cheap, can be applied rather quickly & the deck will look like it was installed yesterday. It is usually a clear coating & for someone who enjoys, “the natural look of the wood,” it can be the perfect solution.
Stain is more costly, gallon prices start at about $18 & go as high as $70! There are basically 2 types, transparent & solid.
Transparent stains come in a limited number of colors. Like the furniture in your home, the wood takes on the color of the stain. The grain remains visible & the oils in the stain penetrate the wood to give it color. Note- this is why preparation is so important. If the wood has old stain or sealer the new stain will not be able to penetrate into the wood, will lay on top of the old stain or sealer & ultimately fail. This type of stain will last from 18 to 36 months depending on the color. Huh? Yes, the color. The darker the stain the longer it will last. Darker stains contain more pigment & the more pigment the longer the wood will retain the color. Make sense? One coat is recommended for transparent stain.

Solid stain… advantages- many colors to choose from, hides defects in the wood & it can make an old deck look really great. If done correctly it can last 5-7 years. The main disadvantage of solid stain is that is very expensive to apply correctly. It requires cleaning, applying a primer coat & two applications of solid stain. That’s like painting your deck 3 times, therefore 3 times the cost! Some people use solid stain without a primer & just apply it every year. It’s not the right way to do it & it will fail if not for the fact that it’s done every year, but it is an option. (See “Stains/Color” for update on Flood One Coat system)

The next day (24 hours). It can also be used on a limited basis between cleaning & coating. (No spilling BBQ grease or oil)
Sealers last one season on average. Transparent stains last 1 1/2 to 3 years depending on the color & weather.
Simple… read everything about decks. It’s the exact same process. Clean, then seal or stain.
Minor exterior repairs, exterior painting, gutter cleaning (only with a house wash), some odd jobs & financial planning. Just kidding about the financial planning but some power washers apparently do just about everything from driveway sealing, window washing, chimney sweeping & repairs & I’m sure their work is good ( I hate to knock the competition), but all we do is what we do.

Yes and it’s officially ok to wear some shades of white after labor day.
1. Don’t water your house or deck. Keep the water on the lawn & bushes, not the house or deck. The extra moisture & added drying times can significantly increase the rate of mildew growth. It’s unsightly & slippery if it grows on a walk or deck.
2. Keep a sturdy pan under the BBQ 7 empty it often, especially if you keep it on your deck. Grease penetrates into the wood & it’s a nightmare to remove. (A normal cleaning will not remove it).
3. Buy vinyl shutters. Cheap, come in lots of colors & very easy to maintain.
4. If your aluminum siding is shot, paint it!
5. Keep your gutters & leaders clean.
6. If you have brick on the ground (patio, walkway) make sure you have enough sand in the cracks. This is a very bad thing not to do. The deterioration process is as follows: The sand that was originally in the cracks blows away &/or rain water compresses the sand that was there. Then when there is an empty crack (between the bricks) dirt blows in. Weeds & grass begin to grow in the cracks. Then you remove the weeds (& the dirt). Then water seeps between the bricks & at first only one brick is a little crooked, then a second & so on & so on, until you have to call in a bricklayer to pull the whole thing out & start over. So just throw some play sand in the cracks & you won’t have big problems later on.
7. Get three estimates for any project around the house & call the Department of Consumer Affairs if you suspect a potential problem. Make certain the company you’re dealing with is licensed & insured. If someone working on your property damages your property & is not licensed & uninsured it’s coming out of YOUR homeowners policy, not the company you hired.
8. Say thank you. You’re Welcome

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